Sending Faxes from Microsoft Outlook

Sending faxes from Microsoft Outlook is virtually the same as sending regular emails. The Imecom Fax Server for Microsoft Exchange makes sending faxes as simple as possible for the end user. With our server-side integration, users can use their existing, unaltered Outlook client to compose and send faxes. That’s right, there’s no client software to install on the workstations and no add-ins to install in Outlook. And for those remote users, Outlook Web Access (OWA) can certainly be used to send and receive faxes.

So, How Does It Work?

To send a fax, simply compose a new mail message in Outlook. The message can be a simple text email or you may attach one or multiple attachments. The key to sending a fax is all in how you address the message. The Imecom Fax Server supports two styles of addressing: SMTP style addressing and the Microsoft FAX or IMCEAFAX style addressing. Imecom Fax Server system administrators may opt to use either of these styles, or implement both styles simultaneously.

What Does A Fax Address Look Like?

That depends on the style of addressing used. SMTP style addressing is quite popular due to the fact that the structure of the address is similar to that of a regular email address. The Microsoft FAX address is also quite common and offers some nice integration options for Outlook Contacts.

SMTP Style Addressing

SMTP style addressing involves creating an internal domain to be used for faxing. Since this domain is internal and not public to the Internet, you can name the domain anything you want. In general, the fax domain name should be easy to remember for the end users. For instance, fax.com is short, simple, and easy to remember. Often times, we find that a customer will create a fax domain that’s similar to the existing mail domain. An example of this in Imecom’s case would be fax.imecominc.com or imecominc.fax. Remember, the domain name is not public, so it can be anything you want.

Assuming we have setup fax.imecominc.com as our fax domain, a typical fax address would look like this: 5551234@fax.imecominc.com

Sending a fax from Microsoft Outlook using SMTP Fax Address

Here, “5551234″ represents the recipient fax number and fax.imecominc.com of course is our fax domain. All that’s required here is number@domain, but you can include additional information in the fax address, such as recipient name, recipient company, recipient department, etc. This information would then be available to the Imecom Fax Server for automatic cover page field population. And you can set the order in which this information is parsed or read.

Microsoft FAX (IMCEAFAX) Addressing

The Microsoft FAX address space is native to Microsoft Exchange and Outlook and has a different syntax than that of the SMTP style addressing. The syntax is quite simple and easy for end users to retain. Further, the Microsoft FAX address space offers a nice integration with Outlook Contacts, which is covered in a separate blog post here.

A typical Microsoft FAX address would look like this: [FAX:5551234]

Sending a fax from Microsoft Outlook using Microsoft FAX Address (IMCEAFAX)

This particular address is enclosed in square brackets. When typing this address, the correct syntax is as follows:

  1. Start with an opening square bracket “["
  2. Next, type the word "FAX" and then a colon ":"
  3. Next, enter the recipient fax number
  4. Last, close the square bracket "]“

As with the SMTP style addressing, here you can also include additional information in the address, such as recipient name, recipient company, etc. This information would precede the fax number with a period being used as a separator. Example: [fax:John Smith.Imecom@5551234].

Which Address Style should I Choose?

This is entirely up to you. Both address styles work equally well. It’s simply a matter of which style works better for you and your end users. For your convenience, Imecom allows both address style sot be used at the same time.

How Do I Make This Work?

You need a fax server. Luckily, we have one. Lean more about Imecom’s Fax Server for Microsoft Exchange.




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